Bookshelf: Moving Across the Country Edition

Occasionally, I’ll be making posts about the books I’m reading/why I think you should read them too. I’ll compile them all over here. If you’re not into that, then skip the posts labeled “bookshelf.” But honestly, if you’re not into books, you’ve kind of come to the wrong blog.

As you might have noticed, about a month and a half ago I packed up all my belongings and moved across the country. I listened to a ton of podcasts on the drive (The Liturgists, What Should I Read Next?, and the Cespedes Family Barbecast are quality binge-listening material), but no audiobooks, because I am still reveling in the post-Race euphoria of holding a physical book, written in English, in my hand. I did, however, read a few books in the process of moving that I absolutely loved.

Along with my annual Harry Potter re-read, here’s what I’ve been into the month since I moved to Seattle:

Assimilate or Go Home: Notes of a Failed Missionary on Rediscovering Faith by D.L. Mayfield This collection of essays centers on Mayfield’s experiences as a missionary living in low-income housing among refugee communities (in the book, primarily Somali Bantu refugees). Y’all, I all-out bawled four different times while reading this book. Mayfield is painfully honest about her motivations for becoming a missionary, and the seismic shifts in her faith that living in low-income housing created. As a very recently returned missionary, some of the things she said hit far too close to home. I immediately gushed about this book to all of my roommates, and now here, because I think everybody should read it.

Rilke’s Book of Hours: Love Poems to God by Rainer Maria Rilke I’ve only recently started reading poetry again, for a lot of reasons. The beauty of some of these poems took my breath away. It is poetry for anyone who has ever doubted God deeply while also loving God deeply. (Also, there’s a really pretty 100th anniversary edition you can buy if you’re into that.)

Wearing God by Lauren F. Winner In this book, Lauren Winner focuses on a different metaphor for God in every chapter. But they aren’t the traditional “good father/shepherd/Savior” metaphors; one chapter is all about the metaphors in the Bible that describe God as clothing. Winner is an excellent writer, and each chapter made me think more deeply about how I speak about God, and how that speech shapes how I interact with the world.

Flour Water Salt Yeast by Ken Forkish Do yourself a favor and make some bread. I’M HERE FOR IT.

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